E3

Data Items


 

A. Catholic Identity-Data Items

 

The data category of “Catholic Identity” requires written identification of . . .
1. the Catholic composition of the student body [rendered as a percentage], including the
respective percentages of current students who have received the Sacraments of Baptism and of Confirmation
2. the daily prayer practice of the School as a whole
3. students’ sense of the extent to which teachers pray with them at the outset of class [to a great extent, moderate extent,  minimal extent]
4. the annual occasions and sites for school‐wide celebrations (a) of Eucharist, (b) of  
Reconciliation, (c) of the School’s patron/namesake, (d) of any other special religious day
5. the parish within which the school is located, and whether the parish clergy provide
Sacramental services to the student body at the school site (If not, who does?)
6. a brief outline of the retreat program that the School has established for students (including
identification of the person/s who deliver this program)
7. the name of the person(s) who gives spiritual direction to students, per their spiritual need
8. the school’s sense of the percentage of the student body who worship God at Mass each Sunday [high percentage, moderate percentage, minimal percentage]
9. the religion department’s sense of the percentage of its students who receive the school’s
religious instruction as catechesis [high percentage, moderate percentage, minimal percentage]   
10. the course requirements in religion that the school sets for students
11. the school’s sense of the extent to which the religion texts in use conform to the USCCB’s
Doctrinal Framework [to a great extent, to moderate extent, to minimal extent]
12. standardized testing results in religion (i.e., ACRE results, if applicable)
13. students’ performance on (comprehensive) religion course exams given at the end of the
semester  [Note:  This Q requires identification of the religion exam, the number of students taking it, and the average numeric grade that was achieved on the exam.  Letter grading could be translated numerically as: ‘A’ = 4; ‘B+’ = 3.75; ‘B’ = 3; ‘C+’ = 2.75; ‘C’ = 2; ‘D+’ = 1.75; ‘D’ = 1]  [rendered as a table]  
14. (major) modifications to the religion department curriculum and instruction that have been implemented from a review of students’ semester exam results [bullet]  
15. the name and the professional qualifications for the teaching of religion of each teacher and her/his number of years of experience as a religion teacher at the school
16. the requirements that the governance body and/or the (arch)diocese set concerning those who teach religion or serve in campus ministry
17. the formative experiences provided by the school, its governance body, or its diocese in order to shape school personnel with responsibility for teaching the Catholic Faith [bullet]
18. school‐sponsored formative events for parents that promote their Catholic identity
19. school‐sponsored formative events for parents that promote their partnership with the school in forming ‘the person of the student’  
20. the school’s perception of the degree to which it treats parents as partners in the educational enterprise [the School perceives that it treats parents as partners: to a great degree, to a moderate degree, to minimal degree.]
21. parents’ perception of the degree to which the School treats them as partners in the
educational enterprise [Parents perceive that the School treats them as partners: to a great degree, to moderate degree, to minimal degree]
22. the School’s sense of the degree of overall parent appreciation for the Catholic identity of the School [The School perceives that the parents’ affect for the school’s Catholic identity is: high; moderate; minimal.]
23. a brief outline of the service program that the School has established for students
24. students’ sense of the extent to which they accomplish a Christological reflection on their
service [to a great extent, moderate extent, minimal extent]
25. the various annual charitable outreaches in which the School participates
26. the three (3) most prominent signs and/or symbols of the Catholic Faith throughout the school
27. the traditional religious practices that the school annually observes(e.g., its observance of
founder’s day or patron day or school namesake day)  
28. the Catholic composition of school personnel [rendered as a percentage] (a) overall and (b) disaggregated according to administration, faculty, and support staff
29. the formative experiences provided by the school, its governance body, or its diocese in order to shape school personnel in responsibility for the Catholic mission of the School [bullet]
30. an example—drawn from a course within each department (religion excepted)—of the infusion of reasonably related Catholic content into the department curriculum
31. the extent to which each of the departments (religion excepted) infuses reasonably related
Catholic content into the department curriculum [e.g., the math department does so to ___  extent: maximum, moderate, minimal (repeat for each department)]  
32. students’ perception of the overall faculty affect for the Catholic identity of the School [Students perceive faculty affect for Catholic identity to be: high, moderate, minimal.]
33. students’ perception of the degree to which a Catholic spirit permeates: (a) all their classrooms; (b) the overall sports program, (c) the ensemble of school activities/clubs/student government; (d) the counseling (i.e., personal/academic/college) that they receive [Students perceive that a Catholic spirit permeates ____  (a/b/c/d) to a great degree, to a moderate degree, to a minimal degree]
34. the School’s sense of the degree of overall student affect for the Catholic identity of the School [The School perceives that the students have a ____ degree of affect for the Catholic identity of the School:  high; moderate; minimal]

B. School Organization-Data Items

 

The data category of “School Organization” requires written identification of  . . .
[Concerning ‘governance’]
1. students’ perception of the degree of care that the School exercises for them as persons
[Students perceive that the degree of care exercised for them as persons is: high, moderate, low.]
2. (a) whether there is a school ownership body distinct from the governing board/council of the school;  (b) the name of this body;  (c) its function in relationship to the school
3. the 3 ‐ 5 most significant school‐related decisions (or policies) of the governance body (i.e., the ownership body and/or the board/council) in the most recent three‐year period
4. the board’s/council’s overall sense of the efficacy of its own operations [In the accomplishment of its own operations, the school board perceives: a high degree of efficacy, a moderate degree, little degree.]
5. the form(s) of evaluation used to evaluate (a) the president and (b) the principal  [In both cases, indicate the evaluating agent/body.]
6. the board’s/council’s overall sense of the efficacy of the school in fulfilling its mission [The board/council perceives that the school fulfills its mission: to a great degree, to a moderate degree, to little degree.]
7. the perception of the school’s board/council concerning the quality of the school’s relationship with its (arch)diocese  [The board/council perceives that the quality of its relationship with its (arch)diocese is:  high; medium; low.]   
8. the perception of the (arch)diocesan school office concerning the school’s responsiveness  to (arch)diocesan policies, concerns, and requests regarding: (a) Catholicity; (b) accreditation; (c) other pertinent matters (e.g., student safety, enrollment operations, participation in diocesan‐initiated meetings) [Indicate the degree of responsiveness for each of (a), (b), and (c) here:  high degree, moderate degree, little degree.] [Concerning  ‘administration’]
9. the 3 ‐ 5 most significant work‐related challenges faced by the administration in the most
recent three‐year period
10. (a) # of administrators   (b) administrators’ years of service at the school [table: 1 to 3 years, 4 to 6, 7 to 10, 11 to 20, +20]
11. the number of administrators (a) with a teaching credential, (b) with an administrative
credential, (c) with a masters degree, (d) with a doctoral degree
12. the retention rate of school administrators (i.e., the current year compared to three years ago)
13. the administration’s overall sense of the degree of its collaboration with its board/council  [The administration perceives itself to collaborate with its board/council: to a great degree, to moderate degree, to little degree.]
14. the administrations’ overall sense of its stewardship regarding the school’s mission  [In exercising stewardship of the school’s mission, the administration perceives that it is: highly effective, moderately effective, minimally effective.]  
15. the administration’s overall sense of the efficacy of its operations [In the accomplishment of its operations, the administration perceives: a high degree of efficacy, a moderate degree, little degree.]
16. the administration’s overall sense of the degree of its cooperation with its (arch)diocesan school office regarding (a) accreditation  (b) attendance/participation at pertinent meetings initiated by the (arch)diocese  (c) other pertinent requirements [signify such] that the (arch)diocese sets for its high schools  [For each matter indicate: high degree of cooperation, moderate degree, little degree.]
17. the students’ perception of the degree to which teachers facilitate their learning  [Students
perceive that teachers facilitate their learning: to maximum degree, to moderate degree, to little degree.]
18. the 3 – 5 most significant work‐related challenges faced by teachers in the most recent three‐year period
19. (a) # of instructors   (b) instructional personnel’s years of service at the school [table . . .  1 to 3 years, 4 to 6, 7 to 10, 11 to 20, +20]
20. the number of teachers (a) with a teaching credential, (b) with an administrative credential, (c) with a masters degree, (d) with a doctoral degree
21. the retention rate of instructional personnel (i.e., current year compared to three years ago)
22. how instructional personnel are hired
23. (a) the kind(s) of formal evaluation(s) that the administration has used to evaluate teachers in the most recent three‐year period;   (b) whether the formal evaluation of all teachers by the administration is an annual experience
24. the professional development trainings that the faculty as a whole has experienced (per
administrative sponsorship) in the most recent three‐year period
25. teachers’ perception of the usefulness in the classroom of the information/skills from the
professional development trainings in #24—i.e., their overall perception and their perception
disaggregated departmentally
26. the professional development requirements that the administration sets (a) for teachers, (b) for itself (i.e., # of CEUs over a defined period of time)
27. the percentage of teachers who, on their initiative, regularly exceed the requirements of
professional development that the administration sets
28. the overall percentage of instruction that is provided by teachers who are teaching outside the subject area for which they were professionally trained [i.e., overall # of courses taught by such instructors “divided by” school’s total # of courses] . . .  and the percentage disaggregated according to these departments:  (a) religion, (b) English, (c) mathematics, and (d) science [Concerning ‘support staff’]  
29. any significant work‐related challenges faced by support staff within the most recent three‐year period
30. (a) # of support staff   (b) support staff’s years of service at the school [rendered as a table with categories that include 1 to 3 years, 4 to 6 years, 7 to 10 years, 11 to 20 years, +20 years]
31. the retention rate of support staff (i.e., current year compared to three years ago)
32. whether, in the hiring of support staff—including athletic coaches, these individuals receive an orientation to the school’s mission and to the intended outcomes for students that the school holds
33. (a) whether the formal evaluation of the support staff (i.e., non‐instructional personnel) by the administration is an annual event;  (b) the kind(s) of formal evaluation that the administration uses to evaluate support staff
34. the perception of support staff concerning the degree of significance of their work in the overall accomplishment of the school’s mission [Support staff perceive that, in relation to the
accomplishment of the school’s mission, their work has significance: to a high degree, to moderate degree, to minimal degree.] [Concerning ‘the organization of the school’]
35. the perception of the School regarding how widespread is the practice of accountability on the part of administration and teachers [The School perceives that the practice of accountability among administrators and teachers throughout the school is: widespread, moderately extensive, minimally extensive.]
36. (a) the nature of the current School schedule (i.e., the configuration of the schedule of classes—whether periodic, exclusively block, or modified block—including whether the classes rotate within the schedule); (b) the number of consecutive years that the School has used this schedule; and (c) the perception of faculty concerning the degree to which the current School schedule of classes is conducive to optimum time‐on‐learning [The perception that the current schedule promotes such: to a high degree, to moderate degree, to minimal degree.]
37. the faculty’s perception of the quality of the content and forms of communication that the
administration uses with them [Faculty perceive that the content and forms of the administration’s communications with them are: highly effective, moderately effective, minimally effective.]
38. the major publications linking the School to the home (hard copy and electronic copy)
39. the School’s perception of the degree of efficacy of the student information system (SIS) in use (Here, ‘SIS’ is understood to contain students’ personal information, their course schedules, their grades, their attendance, and their Christian service record.) [The SIS is perceived by the School to be effective: to a high degree, to a moderate degree, to minimal degree.]
40. the perception of  parents concerning the degree of efficacy of school communications with them  [Parents perceive that the content and forms of the school’s communications with them are: highly effective, moderately effective, minimally effective.]
41. the perception of the School regarding how well overall the school is organized and run—from governance to administration to classroom to home—toward promoting the optimum human and Christian development of students [The School perceives that the quality of its organization and operation is: high, moderate, low.]

C. Teaching & Learning- Data Items

 

The data category of “Teaching and Learning” requires written identification of . . .
1. the sources of the (academic) content standards that comprise the curriculum  
2. the names and sequence of courses available to students in each of the subject areas of
English, mathematics, science, social science, foreign language, aesthetics (i.e., music and
the arts), technology, and physical education  [Religion receives a separate treatment, within
the Catholic Identity standards area.], as well as (identification of) the courses that satisfy the
requirements for matriculation to the state college/university system  [Note:  This latter
identification  may be accomplished by means of an asterisk next to any course, whereby the asterisk designates ‘required course for matriculation to state college/university.’]
3. the number of courses and units (credits) required for graduation, per subject areas
4. the honors courses as well as the advanced placement courses that the school provides . .
and the number of students enrolled in such
5. the record of student achievement in advanced placement courses (i.e., the # of students
tested and the # who achieve a passing grade)  
6. any curricular course or program that the school provides for ELL students . . and the
number of students enrolled in such
7. any curricular course or program that the school provides for students identified with
special needs . .  and the number of  students enrolled in such  
8. any other distinctive kind of curricular course/program/emphasis that the school provides
9. school‐wide responses that seek to remedy students’ low achievement  [bullet them]  
10. the documents that formally communicate academic policies—i.e., school‐wide and
department policies
11. the school entity/entities responsible for school‐wide and department
monitoring/evaluation/development of: (a) curriculum; (b) instructional methodologies; (c)
assessment practices; and (d) grading
12. the perception of each department regarding how well students master the content
standards pertinent to the department  [e.g., The math department perceives that students’ are
____ proficient at math:  maximally, moderately, minimally.]
13. the school’s sense of the degree to which it has identified indicators throughout its whole
educational program that reveal students’ achievement of the Integral Student Outcomes
[The school has identified these indicators to a ____ degree: great; moderate; minimal.]
14. students’ perception of the degree to which they master the Integral Student Outcomes
that the school sets for them toward graduation  [Students perceive that the degree to which
they master the ISOs set by the school for them is:  high; moderate; low.]
15. parents’ perception of the degree to which students master the Integral Student Outcomes
that the school sets for them toward graduation  [Parents perceive that the degree to which
students master the ISOs is: high; moderate; low]
16. school’s perception of the degree to which students master the Integral Student Outcomes  [The school perceives that the degree to which students master the ISOs is : high; moderate; low]    
17. students’ perception of the overall degree of learning rigor that is required of them by the
school’s integral educational program [Students perceive that the degree of overall learning rigor required of them is:  high; moderate; low.]  [A school environment characterized by ‘learning rigor’ tends to include: (the sum of a student’s) initiative, effort, appropriation of content, note‐taking, homework, higher order thinking or critical acumen, moral reasoning, collaboration with peers, creativity, problem‐solving, demonstrated proficiency at required skills……  The survey item that the school uses here should facilitate students’ responses.]
18. students’ perception of the five (5) most common instructional methods that teachers use in the classrooms —i.e., their  perception in an overall sense and disaggregated
departmentally  [These instructional methods are to be drawn from the following list (to which a school may add methods):  teacher presentation on a topic; teacher dialogue with students (Q and A);  student note‐taking;  completion of study guides; individual work; group work;  project‐based work; lab work; graphing;  student research and presentation; computer‐supported work;  performance that demonstrates skill/s; students doing pictorials;  students constructing and testing hypotheses; homework head‐start; teacher feedback to students regarding their work; students checking their work for understanding; student problem‐solving; students doing comparisons and contrasts; teacher modeling the learning asked of students;  teacher guiding the learning‐ practice of students; teacher invites/promotes student questioning;  teacher invites/promotes student critical inquiry;  teacher invites/promotes student belief/faith; peer coaching/editing by students]    
19. students’ perception of the five (5) instructional methods that enable them to learn the
best—i.e., their perception in an overall sense and disaggregated departmentally
20. faculty’s perception of  the instructional methods by which their students learn the best—
i.e., their perception in an overall sense and disaggregated departmentally
21. the departments that make ample use of technological tools (by teachers and students); the
departments that make moderate use thereof; the departments that make minimal use of
technological tools [A highly technological learning environment tends to include:  wireless
access; internet stations in the classroom; computer access for each student; interactive boards; document cameras; subject area software; whiteboards for each student; technology standards embedded in the curriculum; software programs to communicate student progress to parents; a technology plan that includes, among other things, the use/replacement of hardware and  software.]
22. students’ perception of the most common technological tools that faculty employ in
instructing—i.e., their perception in an overall sense and disaggregated departmentally  [The
survey item that the school uses here should facilitate students’ responses.]      
23. faculty’s perception of the most common technological tools that they employ in
instructing—i.e., their perception in an overall sense and disaggregated departmentally  
24. students’ perception of the most common kinds of assessments that teachers employ—i.e.,
their perception in an overall sense and disaggregated departmentally  [Kinds of assessments
include: quizzes, tests (multiple choice),tests (essay format), tests (mixed format), homework,
research paper, evaluative essay, projects, individual student presentation (oral and/or written
format), reports, group presentation, demonstration of skills, performance…… The survey item that the school uses here should facilitate students’ responses.]
25. students’ perception of the most effective kinds of assessments that teachers employ—i.e.,
their perception in an overall sense and disaggregated departmentally [By ‘effective’ is meant
a fair and accurate measure of students’ learning of pertinent curricular content.]
26. teachers’ perception of the most effective kinds of assessment that they employ—i.e., their perception in an overall sense and disaggregated departmentally
27. (a) whether there exists a school‐wider grading scale and, if so, (b) what it is
28. students’ perception of the fairness of grading policies and practices—i.e., their perception in an overall sense and disaggregated departmentally [Students perceive that teachers are ____fair in their grading policies and practices:  highly, mainly, hardly]
29. students’ performance on (comprehensive) course exams given at the end of the semester  
[This Q requires identification of the exam, the number of students taking it, and the average
numeric grade that was achieved on the exam—according to, for example: ‘A’ = 4; ‘B+’ = 3.75; ‘B’ =3; ‘C+’ = 2.75; ‘C’ = 2; ‘D+’ = 1.75; ‘D’ = 1]  [rendered in the form of a table]
30. (major) modifications to a departmental curriculum and instruction that have been
implemented from a review of students’ semester exam results  [bullet]  
31. the standardized tests that the school annually employs at each grade level
32. students’ performance on the standardized tests that the school gives [rendered in the form
of a table]   
33. (major) modifications to curriculum and instruction that have been implemented from a
review of students’ standardized test results: (a) schoolwide modifications and (b) subject
area (i.e., departmental) modifications  [bullet]  
34. the frequency and mode(s) of student academic progress reports from school to home
35. the frequency according to which student report cards are given in a school year  
36. the frequency and mode(s) by which the school communicates students’ academic
achievement (and distinctions): (a) within the school community; (b) to its governance body;
(c) to its (arch)diocese

D. Student Support- Data Items

 

The data category of “Student Support” requires written identification of . . .   
1. whether the school has a comprehensive safety preparedness plan (i.e., a plan that addresses the various emergencies than can come upon a school]
2. the frequency with which the school annually practices its comprehensive safety plan  
3. the requirements that the school observes toward ensuring students’ sexual safety (in keeping with the safety policies emanating from the USCCB’s Charter for the Protection of Children and Youth)
4. students’ perception of the degree to which the school is: (a) a physically safe place for them; (b) an intellectually and emotionally safe place for them  [Students perceive that the school is a _________safe place for them (a)  to a great degree, (b) to moderate degree, (c) to little degree.]
5. parents’ perception of the degree to which the school is: (a) a physically safe place for students; (b) an intellectually and emotionally safe place for them  [Parents perceive that the school is a_________safe place for students (a)  to a great degree, (b) to moderate degree, (c) to little degree.]
6. teachers’ perception of the degree to which the school is: (a) a physically safe place for
students; (b) an intellectually and emotionally safe place for them  [Teachers perceive that the
school is a _________safe place for students (a)  to a great degree, (b) to moderate degree, (c) to little degree.]
7. students’ perception of the degree to which a climate of respect for persons permeates the
school community  [Students perceive that a climate of respect for persons permeates the school: to a great degree; to moderate degree; to little degree.]
8. parents’ perception of the degree to which a climate of respect for persons permeates the
school community  [Parents perceive that a climate of respect for persons permeates the school: to a great degree; to moderate degree; to little degree.]
9. teachers’ perception of the degree to which a climate of respect for persons permeates the
school community  [Teachers perceive that a climate of respect for persons permeates the school: to a great degree; to moderate degree; to little degree.]
10. students’ perception of the degree to which a climate of learning and achievement permeates the school community  [Students perceive that a climate of learning and achievement permeates the school community: to a great degree; to moderate degree; to little degree.]
11. parents’ perception of the degree to which a climate of learning and achievement permeates the school community  [Parents perceive that a climate of learning and achievement permeates the school community: to a great degree; to moderate degree; to little degree.]
12. teachers’ perception of the degree to which a climate of learning and achievement permeates the school community  [Teachers perceive that a climate of learning and achievement permeates the school community: to a great degree; to moderate degree; to little degree.]
13. the requirements that the school sets concerning teachers’ availability to students beyond class hours
14. the ratio of counselors to students (a) overall and (b) per grade level (i.e., freshman level, etc.)
15. the percentage of ELL students (a) overall and (b) per grade level
16. the percentage of students identified with special needs (a) overall and (b) per grade level.
17. the common forms of adjustment/accommodation that the teachers use in responding to
students’ learning needs [cross reference: Teaching and Learning in DL: C.6‐7]
18. the perception of parents of students identified with special needs regarding how well the
school meets their children’s learning needs [Such parents perceive that the school meets their
children’s needs (a) to great extent, (b) to moderate extent, (c) to minimal extent.]  
19. the perception of students enrolled in advanced placement (AP) classes regarding the
effectiveness of these classes in preparing them for optimum achievement on AP exams  [Such students perceive that AP classes are effective (a) to great extent, (b) to moderate extent, (c) to minimal extent.] [cross reference: Teaching and Learning in DL: C.4‐5]  
20. teachers’ perception of the degree of student responsiveness to the academic support
services/options that they themselves provide students [Faculty perceive that students avail
themselves of these services/options (a) to great extent, (b) to moderate extent, (c) to minimal extent.]
21. students’ perception of the effectiveness of the counseling they receive, counseling in the areas of: (a) academic advising, (b) standardized testing, (c) personal guidance toward achieving school success, and (d) professional referrals beyond school.  [Students perceive that this ______counseling is effective:  to great extent, to moderate extent, to minimal extent.]
22. parents’ perception of the effectiveness of the counseling that their sons/daughters receive, counseling in the areas of: (a) academic advising, (b) standardized testing, (c) personal guidance toward achieving school success, and (d) professional referrals beyond school.  [Parents perceive that this ______ counseling is effective:  to great extent, to moderate extent, to minimal extent.]
23. the school’s perception of the effectiveness of the counseling that students receive, counseling in the areas of: (a) academic advising, (b) standardized testing, (c) personal guidance toward achieving school success, and (d) professional referrals beyond school.  [The school perceives that this ______ counseling is effective:  to great extent, to moderate extent, to minimal extent.]
24. the percentage of students participating in the following school programs: (a) the arts, (b)
athletics, (c) student government, and (d)  clubs and activities
25. students’ perception of the quality of the school’s co‐curricular program (a) in the arts, (b) in athletics, (c) in student government, and (d) in clubs and activities. [Students perceive that the quality of the school’s ____ program is (a) high (b) moderately high, (c) low.]
26. parents’ perception of the quality of the school’s co‐curricular program (a) in the arts, (b) in athletics, (c) in student government, and (d) in clubs and activities. [Parents perceive that the quality of the school’s ____ program is (a) high (b) moderately high, (c) low.]
27. the school’s perception of the quality of its co‐curricular program (a) in the arts, (b) in athletics, (c) in student government, and (d) in clubs and activities. [The school perceives that the quality of its ____ program is (a) high (b) moderately high, (c) low.]
28. students’ perception of the extent to which the school’s co‐curricular programs support their attainment of the outcomes that the school intends for them [Students perceive that the school’s program in ____ (a) arts, (b) athletics, (c) student government, (d) clubs and activities supports their attainment of the student outcomes that the school intends: to great extent; to moderate extent; to minimal extent.]  
29. the required frequency of each student’s one‐on‐one meetings with the school’s college
counselor (a) at the frosh level, (b) at sophomore level, (c) at junior level, (d) at senior level  
30. students’ satisfaction regarding the college services that the school provides  [Students perceive these services to be satisfactory: (a) to high degree, (b) to moderate degree, (c) to little degree.]
31. parents’ perception of the quality of the college counseling program of the school [Parents
perceive that the quality of the school’s college counseling program is: high, moderate, low.]
32. the school’s perception (i.e., the perception of counseling/administration) regarding the degree of responsiveness that students demonstrate to the college services offered them [The school perceives that the extent of student responsiveness to the college services offered them is: high, moderate, low.]   
33. the number and percentage of seniors who graduate
34. the percentage of seniors who matriculate to college: (a) overall and  (b) disaggregated
according to 2‐year and 4‐year colleges
35. the aggregate of scholarship monies that colleges offered to graduating seniors
36. the perception of most recent alumni/ae regarding the quality of the preparation for college that they received from the school  [Recent alumni/ae perceive that the quality of the
preparation for college that they received from the school is: highly effective, moderately
effective, minimally effective.] 

E. Material Stewardship- Data Items

 

The data category of “Material Stewardship” requires written identification of . . .  
1. the criteria according to which the school admits students
2. (a) the partner schools (i.e., elementary and junior high) whose students enter the high school as ninth‐graders, (b) the number of students who enter from each partner school
3. the school’s perception of the degree to which the respective partner schools collaborate with the school in the school’s recruitment process [The school perceives that the degree of collaboration of partner schools is: high, moderate, low.]
4. any articulation sessions (i.e., regarding overall curriculum or subject specific sessions or any topic pertinent to the partnership ) that the high school hosts for partner schools/school leaders
5. (a) proximately located Catholic high schools whose recruitment endeavors involve the same partner (elementary) schools, (b) other proximate private high schools whose recruitment endeavors involve the same partner schools, (c) proximate charter high schools
6. the extent to which the school’s enrollment operations conform to its mission and philosophy [The school perceives that its enrollment operations conform to its mission and philosophy: to a great extent, to moderate extent, to little extent.]
7. the quantity and quality of the books and other teaching‐and‐learning resources at hand [The school perceives that the quantity and quality of its teaching‐and‐learning resources are: high, medium, low.]
8. the quality of the physical environment of the classrooms (i.e., the quality of desks, chairs, tables, windows, lighting, heating‐and‐cooling, etc.)  [The school perceives that the quality of the physical environment of its classrooms is: high, medium, low.]
9. the quantity and quality of the technological resources at the service of the teaching and learning  [The school perceives that the quantity and quality of its technological resources at the service of teaching and learning are: high, medium, low.]
10. the quality of the technological infrastructure that supports school internal operations  [The school perceives that the quality of its technological infrastructure in support of operations is: high, medium, low.]  
11. the quality of the maintenance of the school internally  (i.e., its classrooms and facilities) [The school perceives that the quality of maintenance of its classrooms and facilities is: high, medium, low.]  
12. the quality of the maintenance of the school externally (i.e., its buildings and grounds [The school perceives that the quality of the maintenance of its buildings and grounds is: high, medium, low.]  
13. whether there are any deferred maintenance projects concerning the buildings/grounds
14. the physical attractiveness of the school [The school perceives that the degree of its physical attractiveness is: high, medium, low.]
15. the per capita cost of education (aka “true” or “actual cost”)
16. the school’s tuition rate, along with annual percentage increase
17. the process by which the school sets its tuition rate
18. the process by which the school collects tuition
19. the school’s response to delinquent tuition
20. (a) the criteria according to which tuition assistance is awarded, (b) the aggregate amount of tuition assistance given to students, (c) the number of students receiving tuition assistance, (d)the average amount of tuition assistance given
21. The extent to which the school’s practice of awarding financial assistance conforms to its mission and philosophy [The school perceives that its practice of awarding financial assistance conforms to its mission and philosophy: to a great extent, to moderate extent, to little extent.]  
22. the school’s major, annual events by which it raises funds (e.g., an auction, a festival) [bullet] [Note:  Whereas tuition is the “first source” of income, annual event‐based fundraising is the “second source” of income.]
23. the school’s major third sources of income [bullet] [Note:  ‘Third source income’ refers to money that the school receives from its outreach to external sources—for example, an annual appeal, grants from foundations, subsidy or scholarships from the school’s (arch)diocese and/or its sponsoring religious community, and other contributions.]  
24. (a) whether there are government‐provided services—meant for the support of needy students or for the professional development of teachers—to which the school is entitled by law and (b) whether the school accesses such services[If so, include an estimate of the financial equivalency of these services and, in question # 25, include this estimate in the aggregate of “third‐source” revenue.]
25. the percentage of revenue from each of the three sources  [Note:  Tuition income, event‐based fundraising, and third‐source income each make up a portion of the sum of a school’s revenue. What portion?]    
26. the school’s perception of the effectiveness of the operations by which it generates income [The school perceives that the effectiveness of its revenue operations is: high, medium, low.]  
27. the process by which the salary schedule for teachers is set
28. the parity of the school’s salary schedule with the local public school district salary schedule [rendered as a percentage]
29. the average annual increase in faculty’s salary [rendered as a percentage]
30. the elements that constitute the benefit package that the school provides its employees [bullet]  
31. the percentage of the overall expense budget that is constituted by personnel compensation (i.e., salaries and benefits)
32. whether the school has a balanced budget (i.e., annual revenues equal if not exceed annual
expenses)  [Note:  Indicate whether the school has had to tap its reserves or even borrow money in any year.]
33. any debt/s that the school is servicing
34. whether the school has funds on reserve
35. the process by which the school budget is formalized
36. the school’s perception of the quality of its budget‐setting process  [The school perceives that its budget setting process manifests a ___ degree of quality: high, medium, low.]
37. the school’s perception of the quality of its budget oversight process  [The school perceives that its budget oversight process manifests a ___ degree of quality: high, medium, low.]
38. whether the school practices accrual‐based or cash‐based accounting
39. whether an audit or other kind of formal financial review has been conducted in the last three years [Note:  If so, briefly tell the outcome.]
40. the school’s perception of the degree of transparency of its financial operations (i.e., transparent to its clients, its sponsors, and its benefactors)  [The school perceives that the degree of transparency of its financial operations is: high, medium, low.]
41. the extent to which the (sum of the) school’s financial operations conform to its mission and philosophy  [The school perceives that its financial operations conform to its mission and philosophy: to a great extent, to moderate extent, to little extent.]  
42. the major goals of any capital campaign currently in effect
43. the extent to which capital campaign goals (see #42) are realized
44. the publications and other forms by which the school communicates itself to internal and external constituent groups (i.e., to parents, alumni/ae,  sponsors, friends and benefactors, wider civic community)  [bullet]
45. the publications and other forms by which the school markets itself to prospective
students/families [bullet]
46. parents’ perception concerning how well the school communicates itself to them  [Parents perceive that the school communicates itself: highly effectively, moderately effectively, minimally effectively.]  
47. students’ perception of the quality of the school’s website  [Students perceive that the quality of the school’s website is: high, medium, low.]
48. parents’ perception of the quality of the school’s website—how attractive its format? how
substantive its contents? how up‐to‐date its news? [Parents perceive that the quality of the school’s website is: high, medium, low.]
49. the quality of the school’s promotional operations in (a) building relationships with key groups, (b) communicating school news to these groups, (c) fostering enrollment, and (d) engendering donor support  [The school perceives that its promotional operations are _____ successful (maximally or moderately or minimally) in (a); in (b); in (c); and in (d).]
50. the extent to which the school’s promotional operations conform to its mission and philosophy  [The school perceives that its promotional operations conform to its mission and philosophy: to a great extent, to moderate extent, to little extent.]
51. the major features of any existing strategic plan concerning the maintenance/development of material resources [bullet]
52. the perception of the school regarding the quality of its planning in the area of (a) enrollment, (b) classroom and instructional resources, (c) promotional operations, (d) funding, and (e) facilities and buildings and grounds  [The school perceives that its planning in the area of (a); of (b); of (c); of (d); of (e) is: optimally effective, moderately effective, minimally effective.]